Athena Magazine

Fashion, lifestyle, passions

Melbourne crafter/author Pip Lincolne: Meet Me at Mike’s May 23, 2009

mikesAustralian crafter and author Pip Lincolne has a great little shop in Melbourne and the blog and web site to prove it. It’s all called “Meet Me at Mike’s,” even the book. If Athena lived in Melbourne, she’d definitely want a friend like Pip. See more.

 

Sheffield Spring Vintage Fair February 20, 2009

sheffieldFrom our friends at the Sheffield Vintage Fair in rocking’ Sheffield, U.K.:

The Sheffield Vintage Fair returns for a fab Spring special! SHEFFIELD VINTAGE SPRING FAIR SATURDAY MARCH 7TH, 12PM – 5PM @ THE BASEMENT WEST STREET The vintage fair returns for another splendid day of shopping at a brand spanking new location, the newly opened Basement bar on West Street. We’ll have 30 stalls of lovely vintage wears, jewellery, handmade and reworked clothing, crafts, cards, plus much much more! We’ll also be holding a vintage tea party on the day with fine china and beautiful cakes and cupcakes hosted by who else but Fancie Cupcakes! Some of your favourite local shops will be there holding sale price stalls, including Freshmans, Syd and Mallory and Bang Bang. We cant wait, see you there x x

Contact Info
Phone:
01142724842
Email:

Visit their FB page here.

 

The Next Big Fashion Trend: Depression Chic Spring/Summer ’09 January 25, 2009

depressionchic4This post was originally written and published by Louise Sleigh of Catwalk Creative. Her boho chic Fall ’08 story continues to be in Athena’s top 10 hits, since Louise has a psychic prescience about what’s hot and the stock in her fab vintage/resale shop to allows you to get style on a budget. Can we say it enough: We love this practical fashionista from across the Pond! Read her Catwalk Threads blog here. Buy from Catwalk Creative here.

The Next Big Fashion Trend: Depression Chic Spring/Summer 09

There is no doubt that fashion trends are dictated by many influences, from world events and the economy to what teenagers are wearing on the street and even the latest block-buster movie. It appears that our economists failed to see what was coming and yet top designers were already working both sides of the US stock market crash of 1929 to come up with one of my favourite trends of summer 2009.  Yes, you guessed it – the next big thing is depression chic!

The Spring/Summer runways were awash with the most amazing trends ranging from goddess dressing to 80’s trash and vaudeville.  An eclectic mix that will soon be heading to boutiques and high-streets the world over.

As mentioned, one of my personal favourites is the ‘depression chic’ trend (shown above) with insightful designers appearing to be one step ahead of the economists. Now how exactly do they do that? There were lots of sparkly flapper frocks from Alberta Ferretti and Aquilano Rimondi and sack dresses from Burberry and Bottega Veneta (more photos below).

If there’s one thing that every girl should be partying in during Spring/Summer 2009, it’s that perfect fringed dress or the style of clothing with that’s evocotive of the 1920’s and 1930’s. Here’s a couple of my own pieces which are currently for sale in my eBay store: http://stores.ebay.co.uk/Catwalk-Creative.

Some other trends to look out for this coming season are:

Geometric construction
Goddess dressing
Fairytale romance
Laddered stockings/tights
Cutaway clothing
Bondage/fetish clothing
Oversized bows
Marrakech
Sport

80’s trash and vaudeville

Here are some of my favourties:

Aquilano.Rimondi

Bottega Veneta

Charles Anastase

Givenchy

 

Andrew’s Reclaimed – Not One Tree, Not One January 19, 2009

Submitted by Marjorie of Marjorie’s Cracked Plate Jewelry – Manager of the Reclaimed to Fame Market at 1000 Markets.

The following is written by Andrew of Andrew’s Reclaimed – Reclaimed Wood & Garden Accessories

I have always had a fascination with woodworking. One of our most ancient crafts, it is simply amazing to me how far it’s come.

Let me tell you how I started on this journey into woodworking, and how a little resourcefulness and a bit of luck has brought my eco-friendly craft into our gardens.

It started several years back, when I had dabbled a little in woodworking. A little framing here, a bit of decking and fencing there. One sunny weekend I was helping out a friend of mine. He had recently purchased his first home, and was remodeling it. Where to begin? Well, he had decided that the outside would be the best start. He had already dismantled the deck in the back of the house, and was building a new one. All of the new framing and much of the decking he had already purchased, so there we began. Come dusk, when we were close to the end, we realized that we were going to be short on supplies, as the height of the deck was tall enough that it required a railing and balusters.

It wouldn’t have been such a challenge, except the project was on a tight budget. What to do now? That night it came to me. Months ago, I had helped a neighbor friend of mine take down his old barn. The neighbor had not had any use for this decades-old mossy weathered wood, but frankly, I would have hated to see it taken to the landfill. I think even then, in the back of my mind, I knew I would bring this precious wood to good use. I had de-nailed it, and stored it for later use.

Could I re-mill this old gray heap into useful material?

The next morning I told my friend about my plans for this lumber pile. “Couldn’t hurt, Andy”. This is where discovery began. We went back to the house, collected the lumber, and off we went to the table saw. Hours of sawing led to the unveiling of the beauty and durability of this old gray stack of boards. It was beautiful old-growth western red cedar. It looked and smelled wonderful. With the railing parts ready to go, we completed his deck, and he was so happy with it. It was just lovely. A better quality wood by far. Stiffer, stronger, finer grain, and full of color, from cocoa brown to fiery reds and orange. It looked just lovely against his stone gray composite deck boards. It was so rewarding, as I knew this railing was built without having to fell a single tree.

Soon after that, I started my research into the usefulness of cedar. I had no idea that there were so many different species and grades. The year previous I had built my own deck of ironwood, and as beautiful and carefully crafted as it was, I imagined how it would have looked, had I used reclaimed cedar. If a deck could be built from reclaimed cedar, what other possibilities were there?

I had always loved the beauty and strength of an arbor, and decided to plan and build one from reclaimed cedar for next spring, for our own garden. I had always admired the craftsmanship of the European garden arbors and pergolas and their history. I began collecting reclaimed cedar wood beams and boards that autumn. From old decks and fences to large demolition projects, I collected, sorted, planed, and stacked. Every time I planed, I was never disappointed. The color and sweet aroma of this fine decades-old wood has never failed to amaze me, and I just knew that there was real potential for this reclaimed wood.

Once my first arbor was built, I had a drive. Over the winter, I continued learning, and after having built planter boxes, trellises, and other items from the same gorgeous material, I wanted other people to see the beauty of this reclaimed wood, and how useful it could be. I wanted people to see that there are many ways to use reclaimed lumber, and that there was no need to throw it away or burn it. And that there’s another way to minimize our effect on our natural resources.

I remember the conversation my wife, Melissa and I had one day about how we could show people the beauty of this recycled material and how it can be “born again” into our gardens. Where could we possibly start? “How about a farmers market?!” By this time, I had completed several breathtaking garden arbors for neighbors, and I had also started dabbling in different designs, and had completed several custom orders. We applied for the local farmers market, and were accepted. As luck would have it, our first farmers market was a hit. It was so rewarding, the number of people who were fascinated with the beauty and eco-friendliness of reclaimed cedar.

During that spring and summer, between market days, I researched and designed, and began building a variety of useful items, such as the bat houses, Flutterbye Houses, and the A.R. Bee Keep. My goal was not just to build quality into eco-friendly garden structures, but to help others with their desire to live a more eco-friendly lifestyle. One of my most important goals, one that I always strive for, is to always provide my customers with a high quality eco-friendly product.

Since my spring and summer of crafting for the farmer’s markets, I have had the pleasure of being a part of Etsy.com, arguably the very best hand-crafted venue. I will tell you, the very fact that I have been part of the eco-friendly crafts movement has been such a pleasure. Having satisfied customers is for certain one of the most important things to me in my craft, but more than that, bringing more knowledge of eco-friendly material, and eco-friendly ways of being, is rewarding beyond what I can put into words.

I am really excited to see where the new year will take my craft, and look forward to bringing new styles out of the old barn beams and into our little corner of the world, and becoming a greater part of the solution for our increasingly eco-friendly lives.

Visit Andrew’s Reclaimed at http://andrewsreclaimed.1000markets.com

 

The Practical Fashionista January 13, 2009

From Catwalk Creative's fab ebay boutiqueThere’s no accounting for taste—especially good taste. Since my friend Louise has opened up her new ebay store, her cool vintage items have just been flying out of the shop. I mean where else could you find My First Scrabble, a silver halter party top, and a ’70s leather disco bag all in one stop?  Louise has exquisite taste—just check out her fall fashion boho chic story, a perennial fave here on Athena. Then head to her ebay boutique to shop your little heart out. It’s like a little bit of heaven for the practical fashionista.

 

Very Vintage Sewing Patterns on Sale January 8, 2009

vintagepatternsI have a huge confession to make: I am a hoarder of sewing patterns. My stash adds up to hundreds of patterns, and I even purchased an huge old Simplicity pattern cabinet to store them. It’s full. Of course, I’ll never make even a small percentage of these patterns. I just like to look at them and dream about each garment. Vintage patterns are my favorite, and I’m constantly haunting flea markets and garage sales in search of them. Only other pattern collectors would understand, but if you are one, I have a new source. One of my Facebooks friends runs an online sewing pattern store and patterns will be 20% off through January. Pssst … they have a few really cute vintage patterns. Visit ArtDoodad’s Etsy store here.

 

Dreaming of Designer Vintage December 31, 2008

archiveIf I were going to dream up the perfect designer vintage online shop, it would be run by a Parsons-grad, ex-Italian Vogue stylist assistant, former NYC boutique owner. But thankfully I don’t have to dream it up, because it already exists as Archive run by Kerry Bonnell, who exactly fits above description. Whether you crave Chanel or Hermes or anything along those lines, the select treasures in this gem of a site make for shopping that’s easy on the eye and the wallet. Shop Archive here.