Athena Magazine

Fashion, lifestyle, passions

The most important ingredient November 20, 2008

Filed under: Domestic Goddess — rebmas03 @ 3:03 am
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heartThe Domestic Goddess wishes to remind you that the most important ingredient you add to all of your cooking and baking is LOVE.

 

Crazy for That! November 19, 2008

Filed under: Fashionista Files — rebmas03 @ 4:17 am
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1-kenneth_cole_simply_the_best_top_zip_mochaAn online shopping site called Crazy for That: Luxury Items You Can’t Live Without may not seem to be entirely in step with the times, but that depends on your definition of luxury. Since when does a luxury site include Items Under $30 and Eco-Friendly stuff? Crazy For That has an eclectic and affordable mix of accessories. And frankly to me, these days, that’s pretty luxurious. Check them out.

 

Feed Your Head November 18, 2008

headbandI first met Jennifer at my neighbor’s housewarming, and she casually mentioned that she creates headpieces. Little did I know just how red-carpet worthy they are. From Gossip Girl to Martha Stewart Weddings to the catwalk, the gorgeous and glittering headwraps, headbands and turbans by Jennifer Behr are definitely turning heads. Crafted with satin, crystals, feathers and other fancy frippery, these little pretties make a statement, whether it’s for bridal, cocktails or just tripping about town. Check out Jennifer’s line here.

 

A new shopping mall for indie booty November 17, 2008

logo_sp1Posted by Marjorie Cunningham, broken china jewelry designer at Marjorie’s Cracked Plate Jewelry.  She also has a new shop at 1000 Markets.

A new marketplace has opened on the net and it promises to be an exciting one.  1000 Markets opened its doors a few days ago and already independent artisans for filling it up with one-of-a-kind shops.

1000 Markets has some aspects of Etsy in that it is restricted to handcrafted items (though Etsy also carries vintage items which 1000 Markets does not), Facebook in that customers can write on the seller’s Wall and leave comments as to particular products and sellers can create and join groups and communities and WordPress in that sellers can maintain a personal blog in their shop so customers can learn about them.

This new website also is in the process of creating markets, where groups of artisans’ shops will be located according to theme, like food or arts, or region or just a group of friends have gathered together to sell their products.  The site promises many developments in the very near future, but already it’s off to a great start.

So as you’re doing your holiday shopping in the coming weeks, stroll through the shops at 1000 Markets to find unique gifts for your special persons and chat with the merchants there.

 

Indie Jewelry: Sea Glass, Jewels of the Ocean November 16, 2008

Posted by Marjorie Cunningham, broken china jewelry designer at Marjorie’s Cracked Plate Jewelry.

Sea glass—also known as beach glass, mermaid tears, lucky tears, sea gems, drift glass—is the only man-made litter that makes its way into the ocean and turns into a valued item.  The glass is naturally tumbled by the movement of water and sand and is transformed from broken bottles and jars into beautiful smooth frosted glass. Most of the sea glass found on today’s beaches went into the ocean in the late 1800’s to 1960’s. Sea glass is becoming harder to find due to the fact that we are more conscious of what is thrown into the ocean these days and also because manufacturers are replacing glass bottles and jars with plastic.

Many collectors search our shores to see what the tide has brought in.  Mostly kelly green, brown and clear sea glass is found.  Less common are jade and forest and lime green.  It’s rare to find purple or cornflower blue sea glass. To find pink, black, yellow, red or orange is to find quite a treasure.

Artists and creative folks use sea glass and broken china to create all kinds of mosaics.  Birdhouses, chairs, mirrors, vases and even floors are transformed with their beauty. Here’s a look at the numerous ways sea glass is used to create glorious jewelry straight from the sea.

Some jewelry artists leave the natural beauty of sea glass to stand out by itself without embellishment. This rare blue piece from the North Sea is simple yet so lovely.


Rare blue sea glass pendant

Rare blue sea glass pendant

Other artists drill through the center of the sea glass and use the glass like beads, creating a beautiful look like in the following piece.

Sea glass bracelet

Sea glass bracelet

This is a unique piece where the artist used the sea glass in a mosaic-type setting.

Sea glass mossaic pendant

Sea glass mossaic pendant

Sea glass can also be set into bezels, just like gemstones, like this rare red sea glass ring.

red sea glass ring

Red sea glass ring

Sea glass is also wire wrapped by artists

Wire wrapped sea glass pendant

Wire wrapped sea glass pendant

and used in wire crochet creations.

Rare blue wire crochet sea glass necklace

Rare blue wire crochet sea glass necklace

These gifts from the sea can be used in jewelry in the same way as any cabochon or gemstone.  The look of sea glass is timeless and is always in style.

But beware—all sea glass on today’s market is not naturally formed. Tumbled glass looks very similar but is not as valued by either collectors or jewelry customers.

Click on the photos to find out more about each of these sea glass jewelry designs.

 

What If Life Were Facebook? November 15, 2008

Filed under: Now Looky Here,The Real Stuff — rebmas03 @ 3:02 am
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This is just too funny! I had to share …

 

A Charmed World November 14, 2008

poeticaFor a blog that’s worth visiting simply for its sheer beauty, take a peek at Poeta Documenta. As the About Me description says, “Poeta Documenta is a my personal landscape of poetic style … eclectic, bohemian, lyrical.” A dreamscape of romantically gorgeous images, it’s like stepping into another charmed world. If you’re seeking sweet inspiration, take a trip to this universe.